Basset Hounds

A Hunter is Born

The basset hound is descended from the St. Hubert hounds. He was bred to hunt small game because his long ears could stir up and hold scent for the nose to smell. The folds of skin under his chin, called the dewlap, help trap and hold the scent.

The basset hound first gained popularity in France in the late 18th century. They were found in the U.S. during Colonial times, though it wasn’t until the 1920s that they came into their own stateside.

The basset hound has retained the keen hunting ability and gentle demeanor that made him popular from the start.

Basset hound

The basset hound first gained popularity in France in the late 18th century. They were found in the U.S. during Colonial times, though it wasn’t until the 1920s that they came into their own stateside.

It would be hard to find a better pet for families than the basset hound. This breed is sweet, loyal and affectionate. The basset hound gets along well with other pets and is great with children. The breed can be stubborn, so early training is important. With the proper attention, this breed is ideal for a suburban environment. 

Potential owners should be aware that the basset hound is very affectionate — he’ll show his affection with big, slobbery kisses. In fact, this breed tends to slobber quite a bit. If you’re willing to overlook this somewhat messy quality, you will be rewarded with a great, loyal companion.

Basset hound

The basset hound is no small dog. At maturity, this breed can weigh 55-75 pounds and stand 12-15 inches tall. It is important to give him enough space to grow and live.

Owners should remember that this breed is indeed a hunter. Basset hounds have been known to pick up a scent and wander out of the yard if not fenced in. This is problematic because though they are keen hunters, these dogs are not great at finding their way back home and can become lost.

Basset hound
  • This breed’s name comes from the French word “bas,” which means short or low-set.
  • The basset hound is low-maintenance; regular pet grooming, frequent ear inspection and infrequent bathing is usually all that is required.
  • The breed is generally very healthy but those long floppy ears are prone to yeast infections.  
  • Genetic disorders such as primary glaucoma, black hair follicular dysplasia, elbow dysplasia (malformation of the elbow), TMJ dysplasia (malformation of the hinge joint of the jaw) and intervertebral disc disease have been described in the breed.

Basset hounds have gained popularity thanks to their adorable, droopy features and unwavering loyalty. They are an easy dog to love thanks to their friendly temperament and nonchalant attitude. With a little training and a lot of love, a basset hound could be the perfect pet for any family.


If you enjoyed this article, you may also like to read about microchipping pets and finding lost pets.